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Kilimo Nyuki Tanzania

Country: Tanzania | Region: Various

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Swahili for ‘honeybee agriculture’, Kilimo Nyuki was concepted in 2016 to address challenges within the Tanzanian beekeeping and agricultural sector. Farmers that managed cash crops were not effectively utilizing native honeybee colonies to increase crop yeilds. In Tanzania, the potential for improved yields for integrative beekeeping includes avocadoes, sunflowers, squash and many more. Beyond improving agricultural yields, the project provides technical training and equipment for producers in various regions, including Njombe, Iringa, Katavi, Bukoba, Dodoma and Coastal Tanzania.

Honeybee biproducts inlcuding honey, beeswax, and pollen are often supplementary goods that can provide substantial value for full or part-time beekeepers. Providing market access for these biproducts is not just critical for supplemental income to rural producers — the income can incentivize protection of natural ecosystems where honey and bees are already abundant, including vast stretches of Miombo woodland habitat that is home to countless indigenous floral and faunal species.

Kilimo Nyuki aims to organize and encourage beekeeping as a viable economic tool across Tanzania’s diverse ecological systems. By working more directly with local farming and beekeeping communities, Kilimo Nyuki provides another outlet for honeybee biproducts that help support and protect the diversity, challenges, and opportunities of the Tanzanian agricultural and forestry sectors.

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Maryiza

Country: Ethiopia | Region: Multiple

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Each batch of honey reflects a major floral source. Working with small-batch, local producers in natural forests allows for an amazing range of unique honeys.

Working with forest-based communities, these partners are training producers on best-management practices. Improving management practices has allowed for improved floral reflections of indigenous trees of these unique regions which include Gera forest and the Majang Cloud Forest (UNESCO world heritage site) of Ethiopia.

The goal of these community-based products is to build more sustainable and equitable value chains for local populations, while incentivizing the protection of indigenous plants and forest systems.

Maryiza honeys’ are raw and created in partnership with smallholder forest communities that produce honey utilizing traditional beekeeping methods across Ethiopia’s Southwestern Afromontane Region. Given the traditional methods, which you can learn more about on their¬†Field Notes¬†blog, many of their honeys are biodynamic and naturally ferment, crystallize, and/or evolve in other ways. Maryiza honeys’ biodynamic nature does not affect edibility or food safety – like all other honeys, it will never expire.

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