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Rancho San Cayetano

Country: Mexico | Region: Michoacán

Our Story

Rancho San Cayetano is a place that captures the imagination and sweetens the senses. It has areas of endemic Oak and Oyamel (fir) forest as that serve as refuge for the over-wintering Monarchs in the Monarch Butterfly Ecological Reserve. The project supports more than two dozen people in local beekeeping sector.

The region’s bee is melliferous (European), wandering among lilies, jasmine, roses, irises, nine varieties of orchids, jacarandas, Indian tulips, wild flowers, salvias, acacias, acahual, burro grass and many varieties of conifers (fir, pine), ash and fruit trees (especially citrus).

Our beekeeping process came together in 1980 as a personal interest for owning and breeding bees for the use of their honey. Afterwards,  in 1994,  for Rancho San Cayetano’s guests, we began to offer it as part of our quality breakfasts served to them directly and for them to enjoy as a gift from us.

In 2006, we decided to become Organic as this was becoming a eco friendly trend take advantage of this by jumping into the local markets with a good, high quality Michoacán honey for different tables in the city of Mexico. The organic model of integral production with which the Rancho San Cayetano works is a scheme of self-consumption and commercialization of the surplus.

Our Mission

To show all small-scale honey producers from the area how to gain access to larger markets, we ask them to bring their brood boxes, matching quality standards, and we buy from them same honey quality to sell.

A family Business that started with a dream to leave a polluted and crowded  city life behind for a nicer eco-friendly environment a couple of hours outside of Mexico City.

Local Honey from the Monarch Butterfly Reserve also gives an alternative for trafficking wood from the pine forest that later lead to trafficking of different kinds of drugs.

Our trusted and expert beekeepers follow high-quality standards and use treatment free experimental practices with our bees. Our relationship has been ongoing for over 15 years – expanding the amount of production. This commitment is still strong.

Our honeys flow from the native and wild flora of wild flowers around the high lands west of the Michoacán State. The area is clean from industrial pollution, and far from commercial crops and GMOs. This forest contains native, nectar-rich wild flower species that bloom in different seasons, which allow our beekeepers to harvest honey with a great smooth aroma, flavor, color, and texture. We do not blend the honey between our different group batches from hives nor between different harvest seasons, so we can then ensure a unique tradability of each honey and its different outcomes.

Our Honey

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Autumn Morning Farm

Country: United States | Region: Massachusetts

Our Story

Welcome to Autumn Morning Farm. Our objective is to educate the public in the Art of Beekeeping through Natural, Organic and Treatment Free Methods. The honey produced by our bees is Local, Raw, Unfiltered and Unheated. Our honey is strained before it is bottled to remove excess wax particles produced during the uncapping process.

Autumn Morning Farm is a small scale commercial beekeeping operation located in the rich farm land of central Massachusetts. We support the local agricultural industry by working with local farmers to increase their crop production through the use of pollination. Our apiaries are located on local farms that are managed by organic methods. We manage our apiaries the same way.

Our bees are managed using organic methods and our honey is processed using organic standards to deliver the best possible honey to our customers

Autumn Morning Farm and Aunt Chrissy’s Honey are owned and operated by Chris and George O’Neil.

Our Honey

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Kilimo Nyuki Tanzania

Country: Tanzania | Region: Various

Our Story

Swahili for ‘honeybee agriculture’, Kilimo Nyuki was concepted in 2016 to address challenges within the Tanzanian beekeeping and agricultural sector. Farmers that managed cash crops were not effectively utilizing native honeybee colonies to increase crop yeilds. In Tanzania, the potential for improved yields for integrative beekeeping includes avocadoes, sunflowers, squash and many more. Beyond improving agricultural yields, the project provides technical training and equipment for producers in various regions, including Njombe, Iringa, Katavi, Bukoba, Dodoma and Coastal Tanzania.

Honeybee biproducts inlcuding honey, beeswax, and pollen are often supplementary goods that can provide substantial value for full or part-time beekeepers. Providing market access for these biproducts is not just critical for supplemental income to rural producers — the income can incentivize protection of natural ecosystems where honey and bees are already abundant, including vast stretches of Miombo woodland habitat that is home to countless indigenous floral and faunal species.

Kilimo Nyuki aims to organize and encourage beekeeping as a viable economic tool across Tanzania’s diverse ecological systems. By working more directly with local farming and beekeeping communities, Kilimo Nyuki provides another outlet for honeybee biproducts that help support and protect the diversity, challenges, and opportunities of the Tanzanian agricultural and forestry sectors.

Our Honey

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Bidoó Collective, Oaxaca

Country: Mexico | Region: Oaxaca

Certifications: USDA and CERTIMEX Certified Organic

Our Story

Our farmers and their Mixtec ancestors have cultivated this soil for centuries. This is a region with few employment opportunities. Many of its residents leave their native land in search of jobs elsewhere. The producers of BIDOÓ honey focus on the health of their bee populations and the rich local biodiversity. These practices allow them and their families to develop sustainable livelihoods and stay in their own communities.

Harvest Season:November – April
Annual Production:10+ tonnes

The Bidoó Collective manages more than 3000 hives in the remote southwestern coastal region of Costa Chica in the state of Oaxaca. Bidoó producers offer minimal intervention in the production of this USDA and CERTIMEX-certified organic honey. Producers working in various micro-ecological zones take ecological protection and product quality very seriously. This beekeeping community practices mobile extraction, and in remote areas, the producers can be seen carrying the hives and equipment by horse or hand. To protect from pests, producers use an elevated hive system and coat their hives with beeswax instead of paint.

Our Honey

Bidoó Honey’s underlying common characteristics of this honey comes from the campanilla (bell) flowers ubiquitous to elevated jungles of the Sierra Madre del Sur. 

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Cooperativa Mieles del Sur

Country: Chile | Region: Patagonia

Our Story

A handful of beekeepers came together in 2007 and founded Cooperativa Mieles Del Sur to help small-scale honey producers gain access to larger markets. We are now a cooperative of 20 beekeeping families who live in rural areas of the Lakes Region of southern Chile (Patagonia), and our mission is to offer our beekeepers a value-add for their honey, access to botanical and geographic certifications, and a bottling facility that meets exportation requirements. Our beekeepers follow high-quality standards and use treatment-free practices with their bees, and in exchange for this commitment we pay our beekeepers above the market prices for their honey.

Our Honey

Our honeys flow from the native and wild flora of the temperate rainforests of the southern Andes, in areas free from industrial pollution, and far from commercial crops and GMOs. These rainforests contain native, nectar-rich tree species that bloom in different seasons, which allows skilled beekeepers to harvest high-percent monofloral honey varieties that differ greatly in aroma, flavor, color, and texture. Our cooperative does not blend the honeys of different beekeepers or different harvest seasons, and this ensures that each batch is unique and pure.

Annual Production Capacity: Currently 6 tons

Our Facility and Quality Standards

We have a small honey extraction and packing facility that is authorized by the Chilean Health Service and the Agricultural and Livestock Service of the Ministry of Agriculture. Our cooperative sends honey samples to the laboratories of the Catholic University in Santiago for analysis and certification of their botanical origin in accordance with the Chilean Norm NCh2981.012005. Our extraction and bottling facility is inspected and certified to meet European Union and FDA standards. All of our beekeepers have been trained in Good Beekeeping Practices, a governmental program in Chile aimed at assuring beekeepers produce the highest-quality, traceable honey, maintain healthy bees, and use environmentally-friendly practices.

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Apícola Campo Verde

Country: Colombia | Region: Meta

Our Story

Situated between the base of the northern Andes and the ‘bellybutton’ of Colombia, Apícola Campo Verde (ACV) started as a 1000-hectare reforestation project in Meta, Colombia, back in 1988. Covered with Acacia woodland, rivers, and shrubland, the Acacia reforestation project was initially meant (known then as Campo Verde, or Green Field) to supply sustainable construction materials for nearby Villavicencio. That all changed when honeybees showed up, and the farm began learning and implementing sustainable beekeeping practices.

The project now has up to 500 active hives, and provides refuge to numerous plants and animal species, including giant armadillo.

Our Honey

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Maryiza

Country: Ethiopia | Region: Multiple

Our Story

Each batch of honey reflects a major floral source. Working with small-batch, local producers in natural forests allows for an amazing range of unique honeys.

Working with forest-based communities, these partners are training producers on best-management practices. Improving management practices has allowed for improved floral reflections of indigenous trees of these unique regions which include Gera forest and the Majang Cloud Forest (UNESCO world heritage site) of Ethiopia.

The goal of these community-based products is to build more sustainable and equitable value chains for local populations, while incentivizing the protection of indigenous plants and forest systems.

Maryiza honeys’ are raw and created in partnership with smallholder forest communities that produce honey utilizing traditional beekeeping methods across Ethiopia’s Southwestern Afromontane Region. Given the traditional methods, which you can learn more about on their Field Notes blog, many of their honeys are biodynamic and naturally ferment, crystallize, and/or evolve in other ways. Maryiza honeys’ biodynamic nature does not affect edibility or food safety – like all other honeys, it will never expire.

Our Honey

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